speaker, coach, consultant

It's just talk

'"A bias for action" is an attitude, not a program or strategy. Hence there is no 10 step implementation guide." -- Tom Peters, The Little Big Things, 163 Ways to Pursue Excellence

This post could practically write itself.

If I had one message to share, it would be this: there's too much (banal) talk and not enough concrete action.

In a sense, I don't give a flying fig about strategy or Blue Oceans. What matters to me is getting things done. But more than that, working with people who are prepared to fail, and fail faster than anyone else.

Perhaps I've been exposed to a sector -- professional services -- that tops the Charts when it comes to prevarication and procrastination, but I don't think so. When I listen to people talk about their sector or company, I realise that we've a mindset problem which necessitates that we overwork the problem and some.

I'm going to end it there, but, suffice to say, the next time you find yourself ensconced in a meeting, my advice is to set a timer running, limited to, say, 10 mins and ensure that when the bell goes, you've all agreed on the next steps, i.e. what each and every person is going to do and by when. It doesn't matter that it feels half-baked, crude or rudimentary -- everything will work itself out providing you act; but the thing is, the longer you allow the meeting to go on for the more reasons you'll find to extend the programme, and in the end nothing or very little will get done.

PS. I'm indebted to Adyashanti for the above heading. It's what his Zen master used to say to him, no doubt when he was questioning all manner of spiritual wonderment. The truth is whether it's meditation of innovation, nothing, and I repeat nothing, beats action.

PPS. The above book is still my favourite Tom Peters book. You should buy a copy.