Another story

“It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see.” -- Henry David Thoreau

It's axiomatic that time waits for no one.

And yet, we squander so much of our life doing things that, in the end, count for little -- to us as well as everyone else. (Yes, there's more than a soft tone of melancholy wrapped around those words, but how many of us, with our one and precious life, are trying to move the needle beyond mere existence?)

Of course, it's difficult to know what to do with our life -- why should it be easy? -- but imagine if all of us had an inherent drive to do good, help others, work not for profit or gain but a bigger picture, i.e. erradicating world hunger, and to have a higher calling beyond the consumerist ideal that so many of us are afflicted by.

If this sounds like a world of collective unconsiousness or a field of somnambulists controlled from above or so far fetched to be beyond any concept of reality, then I can understand why you'd feel that way, but I don't think that living in a world where the fittest (only) survive is any way to live. Do you?

As we reflect, as we always do at this time of year, we'd do well to remember the less fortunate, the repressed, those lost in conflict, the dispossessed, the lost animal species and the degradtion of our unique planet, but more than that, we should challenge our individual conscioussness to understand how to make a dent --
any dent -- that might have a positive, cumulative affect in the coming years.

For the record, this message applies as much to me, if not more so!, as it does to every person on this planet that lives currently with such abundance.


PS. Below is a short video from Charles Eisenstein that might enable you to understand the story of self (at least one version of it).